25th October 2013

The school run, waking up late, University or the “I’ll eat later” excuse are not justifiable reasons to skip one of the most important meals of the day. During one’s dormant state, the body has been deprived of food for a number of hours. It is significantly important that you fuel your body in order to function efficiently throughout the day. Additionally, the likelihood of binging on sugar ridden snacks as a supplement for skipping breakfast decreases greatly. Our bodies crave sugar because of glucose which is needed during the chemical process of respiration in which energy is released from food. Low blood sugar levels cause irritability and fatigue – both of which we could all do without, especially on a Monday morning. Consume something light enough for the early morning but heavy enough to keep you satisfied until lunchtime. Breakfast kicks starts your day and improves general mental performance.

Opulent oats

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/galant/3294687099

What’s better than the confines of an insulated duvet on an unforgiving winter morning? An ample portion of oats ‘with a multitude of benefits. It has been proven to lower cholesterol by 20% if eaten every day. Its high fibre content keeps you feeling full for longer (which helps to sustain weight) at a stable blood sugar level, this means no sky scraping sugar highs and steep crashes to the depths of despair, furthermore, a breakfast with high sugar and fat content is laced with problems; you’ll be starving quicker than you can say sayonara. The soluble fibre within oat grains reduces hypertension while keeping bowel movements regular. Consuming oats is perfect if you’re looking to lead a healthier lifestyle as oats have the optimum balance of protein and essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and beta glucan which has healing properties. As an antioxidant, it contains selenium which works with Vitamin E throughout the body to aid in the reduction of asthmatic symptoms and heart disease as well as the prevention of colon cancer.

What I particularly enjoy about oats is its neutral taste which makes combinations endless, whether its fruits or honey (responsibly of course). If you’re strapped for time, try an oats smoothie. Blend together bananas and strawberries with milk, honey and cinnamon (great for influenza and brain function). The natural sugars from the bananas and strawberries will be sure to appease your sweet tooth, a healthier substitute for processed sugars that won’t cause a blood sugar spike. What’s even better about oats is that its hypoallergenic properties means its great for sensitive skin and can be used as a facial exfoliant or bath bomb!

Obliging Omelette with radiant toasted rye bread

An omelette complete with onions, tomatoes and sliced sausage with a carbohydrate addition – MmMmMm! Eggs are a rich source of Vitamin B choline which helps the body to produce new cell membranes whilst reducing chronic inflammation, a consequence of the body’s natural healing process becoming harmful which can lead to heart disease and diabetes. The protein in eggs aids in muscle building boosts the immune system, repairs tissue and gives you healthy skin and nails. Tomatoes contain lycopene, an antioxidant that wards off prostate, breast and stomach cancer as well as age-related macular degeneration (the decay of the back of the eye) and fighting physical signs of ageing (wrinkles). Cooked tomatoes contain more lycopene, because of its fat solubility, I recommend frying omelettes in coconut oil. Although I detest onions with a passion, the phytochemicals within my most loathed vegetable improves the manner in which Vitamin C works within your body for increased immunity and reducing the risk of gastric ulcer development.

As a carnivorous villain, for me, an omelette isn’t complete without something I can really sink my canines into – sliced sausage. Not only is it an added boost of protein, they provide energy and help with the maintenance of muscle mass. Pork sausage has been categorised as unhealthy because of its high sodium content, so you may want to substitute this with turkey sausage, turkey contains amino acid tryptophan that helps with sleep and curbing hunger while chicken sausage doesn’t contain as much fat as pork sausage.

Rye bread is low on the glycaemic index which prevents gall stones and is packed with nutrients such as iron, potassium, calcium, zinc, vitamin E and B.

Mighty Millet porridge

Source: http://www.tessadomesticdiva.com/2011/05/millet-porridge.html

The cereal plant millet has been crowned as one of the World’s healthiest foods because of its infastructure of important nutrients such as manganese (essential for healthy bones) phosphorus (aids in the development of teeth and assists in kidney processes) and magnesium (keeps blood pressure normal and the heart healthy) Millet porridge is a worldwide favourite. It’s a popular breakfast in the African countries of Ghana and Ethiopia, an ingredient used in roti in India and cooked with rice and beans in the Caribbean. A serving of 174 grams includes over 80 nutrients and significantly lowers the risk of Type 2 Diabetes, moreover, it helps develop and repair body tissue, prevents gall stones, breast cancer and heart failure. It’s a God send for postmenopausal women with high cholesterol or other cardiovascular diseases. Before cooking, rinse millet thoroughly with water to get rid of debris. Add water and leave to boil, cover and let it simmer for at least 25 minutes. For a nuttier alternative, roast millet grains before boiling.